We decided when we were first talking about the trip that we wanted to go with metal panniers as they are sturdy, weather resistant, and secure. StahlKoffer were considerably cheaper than the alternatives without any noticeable loss of quality, plus are close to home and have a very helpful owner, which always makes things easier.

StahlKoffer panniers do not make a fitting kit to attach their panniers to the Moto Guzzi V7 Classic. Actually very few people make any accessories specifically for them so we are having to adapt a lot of things from other bikes or get things made specially. Bernie from StahlKoffer explained that he could develop a fitting kit for us but that we could probably get it done much cheaper by going to a small engineering business. He provided us with 2 pairs of his pannier loops, unpainted in plain steel, so that we could get brackets made and welded on.

We approached a good friend, Tich, whose main business is wiring vehicles (and motorcycle wiring especially) but who is also a dab hand at fabrication. Tich agreed to do the job for us and so we rode the bikes down to Swindon. After much head scratching and consideration (not to mention plying with alcohol!), he designed and fabricated a fitting system to put the panniers exactly where we wanted them on the bikes. Not as easy as it might seem as the bikes are physically quite small and, whilst we wanted to keep the weight as far forwards as possible, we wanted to retain the ability to carry a passenger should it prove necessary.

I am impressed with the result, each pannier loop has three fitting points on the bike. Tich created the upper two by welding brackets onto the brand new Moto Guzzi racks that we had had fitted. I must say that Tich’s face as he took a grinder to remove the chrome from the beautiful Guzzi racks so that he could weld on the brackets was a picture!

He has created four mounting points on each of the pannier loops as the lower bracket is triangulated. They are not only functional and are strong enough to use to pick up the back end of the bike, but look nice too, which is important to me as the V7 is a very pretty bike.

We returned the now modified pannier loops to Bernie at StahlKoffer so that he could get them plastic coated in his usual way. In the meantime we needed to get what was left of the chrome plate stripped off the Moto Guzzi racks and get them shotblasted and powder coated. Redditch Shotblasting were recommended to us by one of the guys at Speedaway motorcycles. The guys at Redditch Shotblasting are bikers and so understood our requirements. They recommended a black satin finish for the racks as it is just as durable but does not show marks as readily as gloss and so looks better for longer. Two days later I was amazed to get a telephone call to say that the racks were ready for collection. We were very pleased as they have done an excellent job for a good price.

With the racks fitted it was time to sort out going back to see Bernie at StahlKoffer in order to fit the now plastic coated pannier frames and sort out the panniers themselves…

Sorting out the Panniers Part OneStahlKoffer panniers do not make a fitting kit to attach their panniers to the Moto Guzzi V7 Classic. Actually very few people make any accessories specifically for them so we are having to adapt a lot of things from other bikes or get things made specially. Bernie from StahlKoffer explained that he could develop one for us but that we could probably get it done much cheaper by going to a small engineering business. He provided us with 2 pairs of his pannier loops, unpainted in plain steel, so that we could get brackets made and welded on.
We approached a good friend Tich, whose real business is vehicle wireing (TWS) but who is also a dab hand at fabrication. Tich agreed to do the job for us and so we rode the bikes down to Swindon. After much head scratching and consideration, not to mention plying with alcohol, he designed and fabricated a fitting system to put the panniers exactly where we wanted them on the bikes. Not as easy as it might seem as the bikes are physically quite small and, whilst we want to keep the weight as far forwards as possible, we want to retain the ability to carry a passenger should it prove necessary.
I have to say that I am impressed with the result, each pannier loop has three fitting points on the bike. Tich created the upper two by welding brackets onto the brand new Moto Guzzi racks that we had had fitted. I must say that Tich’s face as he took a grinder to remove the chrome from the beautiful Guzzi racks so that he could weld on the brackets was a picture.
He has created four mounting points on each of the pannier loops as the lower bracket is triangulated. They are not only functional and are strong enough to use to pick up the back end of the bike, but look nice too, which is important to me as the V7 is a very pretty bike.
We returned the now modified pannier loops to Bernie at StahlKoffer so that he could get them plastic coated in his usual way. In the meantime we needed to get what was left of the chrome plate stripped off the Moto Guzzi racks and get them shotblasted and powder coated. Redditch shotblasters were recommended to us by one of the guys at Speedaway motorcycles. The guys at Redditch Shotblasters are bikers and so understood our requirements. They recommended a black satin finish for the racks as it is just a durable but does not show marks as readily as gloss and so looks better for longer.
Two days later I was amazed to get a telephone call to say that the racks were ready for collection. I must say that they have done an excellent job for a good price. So with the racks fitted it was time to sort out going back to see Bernie at StahlKoffer in order to fit the now plastic coated pannier frames and sort out the panniers themselves.

Advertisements